Equal Opportunity Laws

Lunenburg Public Schools is an equal opportunity employer. As an equal opportunity employer, the Lunenburg Public Schools does not discriminate because of an individual's race, creed, ancestry, color, sex, age, religion, handicap or disability, marital, home or veterans status, national origin, sexual orientation or any other legally protected status (in compliance with Titles I, VI, VII, IX and Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, McKinney-Vinto Act). The Lunenburg Public Schools is committed to upholding non-discrimination laws in its hiring and employment practices. Federal laws addressing discrimination include:
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The law also protects employees from retaliation if employees complain about discrimination or participate in an EEOC investigation or lawsuit.
Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA) protects men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination;

Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from discrimination because of age. The law also protects employees from retaliation if employees complain about age discrimination or participate in an EEOC investigation or lawsuit.

Title I and Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits employment discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in the private sector, and in state and local governments. The law also protects employees from retaliation if employees complain about discrimination or participate in an EEOC investigation or lawsuit.

Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with isabilities who work in the federal government. The law also protects employees from retaliation if employees complain about discrimination or participate in an EEOC investigation or lawsuit.

Civil Rights Act of 1991, which, among other things, provides monetary damages in cases of intentional employment discrimination.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act amended Title VII to make it illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.
State laws addressing discrimination and other personnel matters:
 
Chapter 622, of the General Laws of Massachusetts, Title VI, Title IX, and Section 504 provides: No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission to a public school of any town and that all programs, activities, and employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability. To report a case of discrimination or to obtain further information please contact our Coordinator of Title VI, Title IX, and Section 504: Ms. Karen Martin, Director of Instructional Services, 1401 Massachusetts Avenue, Lunenburg, MA 01462, 978-582-4122 (Ext. 3112). All reports are taken seriously and addressed in accordance to federal and state law as well as district policy.

An Act Relative to Gender Identity
Effective July 1, 2012 gender identity will be included in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ anti-discrimination laws as a protected class. The law also includes protection of transgender persons under existing hate crime laws. Gender identity, under this law, is defined as “a person’s gender-related identity, appearance or behavior, whether or not that gender-related identity, appearance or behavior is different from that traditionally associated with the person’s physiology or assigned sex at birth.” The law further states that gender identity “may be shown by providing evidence including, but not limited to, medical history, care or treatment of the gender-related identity, consistent and uniform assertion of the gender-related identity or any other evidence that the gender-related identity is sincerely held as part of the person’s core identity.”
 
Lie Detector Test: It is unlawful in Massachusetts to require or administer a lie detector test as a condition of employment or continued employment. An employer who violates this law shall be subject to criminal penalties and civil liability (MGL: c.149, s. 19B).

Applicants for Employment and Sealed Records: An applicant for employment with a sealed record on file with the Commissioner of Probation may answer "no record' with respect to an inquiry herein relative to prior arrests, criminal court appearances or convictions. An applicant for employment with a sealed record on file with the commissioner of probation may answer "no record' to an inquiry herein relative to prior arrests or criminal court appearances. In addition, any applicant for employment may answer "no record' with respect to any inquiry relative to prior arrests, court appearances and adjudications in all cases of delinquency or as a child in need of services which did not result in a complaint transferred to the superior court for criminal prosecution

Applicants for Employment and Volunteer Service: Massachusetts General Law (chapter 149, section 52B) states, applicants may include any verified work performed on a volunteer basis.

Massachusetts Law Regarding Maternity Leave:
Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 151B, s. 4(1) and c. 149, s. 105D every full-time female employee is now entitled as a
matter of law to at least eight weeks maternity leave if she complies with the following conditions:

1. She has completed an initial probationary period set by her employer which does not exceed six months or in the event the employer does not utilize a probationary period for the position in question has been employed for at least three consecutive months and

2. She gives two weeks’ notice of her expected departure date and notice that she intends to return to her job.

The following text is effective 07/01/93

She is entitled to return to the same or a similar position without loss of employment benefits for which she was eligible on the date her leave commenced, if she terminates her maternity leave within eight weeks. (The guarantee of a same or similar position is subject to certain exceptions specified in M.G.L. c. 149, s. 105D.)

Accrued sick leave benefits shall be provided for maternity leave purposes under the same terms and conditions which apply to other temporary medical disabilities.

Any employer policy or collective bargaining agreement which provides for greater or additional benefits than those outlined in this notice shall continue to apply.

For a more detailed explanation of these laws, please visit
www.eeoc.gov the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission website. For state laws and initiatives relative to discrimination and workplace rights (including minimum wage requirements) please visit http://www.ago.state.ma.us the website of the Massachusetts Attorney General.